Forums/NHL Signings

New Jersey Devils signed Ty Smith (3 Years / $1,325,000 AAV)

Was this a good signing?
The chart has been hidden

Poll Options

 

Aug 20 at 1:06 PM
#1
Ty Smith has signed a new contract with the New Jersey Devils.
ENTRY-LEVEL CONTRACT
COMPARE THIS CONTRACT
LENGTH: 3 YEARS
EXPIRY STATUS: RFA
SIGNING TEAM: New Jersey Devils
VALUE: $3,975,000
C.H.% : 1.16
SIGNING DATE: August 20, 2018
SOURCE: CapFriendly
SEASONCLAUSECAP HIT AAV P. BONUSES S. BONUSES BASE SALARY TOTAL SALARY MINORS SALARY
2018-19$925,000$1,325,000$400,000$92,500$832,500$925,000$70,000
2019-20$925,000$1,325,000$400,000$92,500$832,500$925,000$70,000
2020-21$925,000$1,325,000$400,000$92,500$832,500$925,000$70,000
TOTAL$2,775,000$3,975,000$1,200,000$277,500$2,497,500$2,775,000$210,000
Aug 20 at 3:51 PM
#2
Joined: Jun 2017
Posts: 453
Likes: 42
The Stuart Percy of this draft
Aug 20 at 4:26 PM
#3
Failed the Eye Test
Joined: Nov 2015
Posts: 995
Likes: 794
Quoting: AIRWICK
The Stuart Percy of this draft


Smith outperformed Percy tremendously in his draft year. Percy never got close to point per game, even in his draft+1 or draft+2 seasons.
Aug 20 at 7:27 PM
#4
Joined: Dec 2017
Posts: 180
Likes: 38
Ty Smith could be a future 1st pair defenseman for the Devils. He has the offensive upside to score 50-55 points a game and run the power play. He'll also have the opportunity to develop his defensive game while playing in John Hynes' system. I truly believe this was one of the better value picks in the 1st round of the 2018 NHL Draft. But only time will tell.
rebecca liked this.
Aug 21 at 3:58 PM
#5
Joined: Apr 2017
Posts: 79
Likes: 26
While signing your first rounders is generally always a good signing, I question if it needed to be done *right now*. The chances of him making the NHL out of camp, even on the Devils, are slim to none. While it’s good to at least give him the motivation, I question if developing on a squad with no established solid D core would further his development. It could certainly backfire as we have seen with youngsters brought up/in too early.

The second consideration with the signing is that the Devils have just 4 contract spots remaining. Assuming they wish to leave 1-2 for flexibility in season to make trades, that means they can only sign 2 or at the most 3 other players to NHL contracts. While the domestic and intl UFA market isn’t very deep right now, there could still be useful pieces to add (esp to strengthen the blueline) and there could be trades bringing back extra bodies (2 for 1 sort of deals) if they’re dealing away verterans to bring in youngsters.
Aug 21 at 7:37 PM
#6
Sensible Commentary
Joined: Jul 2016
Posts: 579
Likes: 145
Quoting: rebecca
While signing your first rounders is generally always a good signing, I question if it needed to be done *right now*. The chances of him making the NHL out of camp, even on the Devils, are slim to none. While it’s good to at least give him the motivation, I question if developing on a squad with no established solid D core would further his development. It could certainly backfire as we have seen with youngsters brought up/in too early.

The second consideration with the signing is that the Devils have just 4 contract spots remaining. Assuming they wish to leave 1-2 for flexibility in season to make trades, that means they can only sign 2 or at the most 3 other players to NHL contracts. While the domestic and intl UFA market isn’t very deep right now, there could still be useful pieces to add (esp to strengthen the blueline) and there could be trades bringing back extra bodies (2 for 1 sort of deals) if they’re dealing away verterans to bring in youngsters.
If Smith plays for Spokane next year, his contract doesn't count against the 50-contract limit. This at least gives the Devils options, should he actually happen to wow them straight out of camp, like, say, Jakob Chychrun with Arizona.

Also, he gets dat signing bonus moniezzzzzz, and it's a nice gesture of goodwill.
rebecca liked this.
Aug 21 at 9:35 PM
#7
Joined: Jun 2018
Posts: 699
Likes: 161
Quoting: rebecca
While signing your first rounders is generally always a good signing, I question if it needed to be done *right now*. The chances of him making the NHL out of camp, even on the Devils, are slim to none. While it’s good to at least give him the motivation, I question if developing on a squad with no established solid D core would further his development. It could certainly backfire as we have seen with youngsters brought up/in too early.

The second consideration with the signing is that the Devils have just 4 contract spots remaining. Assuming they wish to leave 1-2 for flexibility in season to make trades, that means they can only sign 2 or at the most 3 other players to NHL contracts. While the domestic and intl UFA market isn’t very deep right now, there could still be useful pieces to add (esp to strengthen the blueline) and there could be trades bringing back extra bodies (2 for 1 sort of deals) if they’re dealing away verterans to bring in youngsters.


I think you need to better understand how slide contracts work.

if he plays less than 10 games in the NHL his contract automatically adds an additional year. (this can happen twice) If he signs next year he would only be eligible to slide once. If he signs 2 years from now his contract can't slide at all. So not playing in the NHL for the next 2 years does NO HARM to his contract at all. Actually no playing in the NHL next year would lower his cap hit because after the contract slides it would no longer factor in that years signing bonus

Which means if he doesn't play in the NHL for 2 years he will still have 3 years on an entry level contract at a lower cap hit than if he signed his 3 year ELC 2 years from now.

there is really no downside to signing your 18 year old draft picks right away
Aug 21 at 10:39 PM
#8
Joined: Apr 2017
Posts: 79
Likes: 26
Quoting: Shifttee
I think you need to better understand how slide contracts work.

if he plays less than 10 games in the NHL his contract automatically adds an additional year. (this can happen twice) If he signs next year he would only be eligible to slide once. If he signs 2 years from now his contract can't slide at all. So not playing in the NHL for the next 2 years does NO HARM to his contract at all. Actually no playing in the NHL next year would lower his cap hit because after the contract slides it would no longer factor in that years signing bonus

Which means if he doesn't play in the NHL for 2 years he will still have 3 years on an entry level contract at a lower cap hit than if he signed his 3 year ELC 2 years from now.

there is really no downside to signing your 18 year old draft picks right away


I’m sorry for the misunderstanding but thanks for mansplaining something I am already very aware of. I’m not talking about whether his contract will end early - he can slide for the next 2 years and his 3 year deal will expire at the end of 5 years. I was critiquing if it’s the best development step to bring him to the bigs at this stage.
Aug 21 at 10:41 PM
#9
Joined: Apr 2017
Posts: 79
Likes: 26
Quoting: DragonRaptorHybrid
If Smith plays for Spokane next year, his contract doesn't count against the 50-contract limit. This at least gives the Devils options, should he actually happen to wow them straight out of camp, like, say, Jakob Chychrun with Arizona.

Also, he gets dat signing bonus moniezzzzzz, and it's a nice gesture of goodwill.


This is true. Does anyone know when a player’s contract no longer officially counts towards the 50-limit? Theoretically he could be brought over from the W at any time, so a I guess if the Devils have 50 other contracts playing in the pro ranks then, even if he is signed, he won’t be able to play cause of the 50-player limit.
Aug 21 at 11:13 PM
#10
Joined: Jan 2018
Posts: 111
Likes: 35
Edited Aug 21 at 11:42 PM
Quoting: rebecca
This is true. Does anyone know when a player’s contract no longer officially counts towards the 50-limit? Theoretically he could be brought over from the W at any time, so a I guess if the Devils have 50 other contracts playing in the pro ranks then, even if he is signed, he won’t be able to play cause of the 50-player limit.


He can't be brought over from the WHL at any time. Players in junior can only be brought up in any emergency situation, where the are the only option available for a team. Once he is sent back to juniors, should he not make the team, he is there until the season in the W is done. As for who counts towards the 50 and who doesn't, "players who are meet the following three conditions do not count to this limit: 1. The player is 18 or 19 years of age. 2. Is in a junior league, and 3. who have not played 10 NHL games the current season"
rebecca liked this.
Aug 21 at 11:43 PM
#11
Sensible Commentary
Joined: Jul 2016
Posts: 579
Likes: 145
Edited Aug 21 at 11:49 PM
Quoting: rebecca
This is true. Does anyone know when a player’s contract no longer officially counts towards the 50-limit? Theoretically he could be brought over from the W at any time, so a I guess if the Devils have 50 other contracts playing in the pro ranks then, even if he is signed, he won’t be able to play cause of the 50-player limit.
as noted above, players in any of the CHL's component leagues (QMJHL, OHL, WHL) have to play out their season with their junior team once they're sent down until their season is done ('cept in emergency situations).

18- and 19-year-olds either in the CHL or on loan to a European team don't count against the 50-contract limit (in essence, while their contracts are eligible to slide, they don't contribute to the total number of contracts). in Smith's case, if he plays for Spokane for the next 2 seasons (very probable), he won't count against the 50-contract limit for those 2 seasons. once he starts playing for Binghamton (or whoever the Devils' affiliate is at that time), then he'll start counting towards the contract limit.
rebecca liked this.
Aug 22 at 9:56 AM
#12
Joined: Apr 2017
Posts: 79
Likes: 26
Quoting: DragonRaptorHybrid
as noted above, players in any of the CHL's component leagues (QMJHL, OHL, WHL) have to play out their season with their junior team once they're sent down until their season is done ('cept in emergency situations).

18- and 19-year-olds either in the CHL or on loan to a European team don't count against the 50-contract limit (in essence, while their contracts are eligible to slide, they don't contribute to the total number of contracts). in Smith's case, if he plays for Spokane for the next 2 seasons (very probable), he won't count against the 50-contract limit for those 2 seasons. once he starts playing for Binghamton (or whoever the Devils' affiliate is at that time), then he'll start counting towards the contract limit.


Thanks! I sorta knew that but it’s the minutia that even a nerd like I can’t keep straight.

Then you move beyond Canada and you have some under 20’s who have their NHL ELC’s start ticking when they’re in the AHL and who some who don’t. And...well, I wish I’d never started down this road.
Aug 22 at 10:03 AM
#13
Joined: Apr 2017
Posts: 79
Likes: 26
Quoting: J2W
He can't be brought over from the WHL at any time. Players in junior can only be brought up in any emergency situation, where the are the only option available for a team. Once he is sent back to juniors, should he not make the team, he is there until the season in the W is done. As for who counts towards the 50 and who doesn't, "players who are meet the following three conditions do not count to this limit: 1. The player is 18 or 19 years of age. 2. Is in a junior league, and 3. who have not played 10 NHL games the current season"


Thanks for the deets.
J2W liked this.
Aug 22 at 10:35 AM
#14
Failed the Eye Test
Joined: Nov 2015
Posts: 995
Likes: 794
Quoting: rebecca
I’m sorry for the misunderstanding but thanks for mansplaining something I am already very aware of. I’m not talking about whether his contract will end early - he can slide for the next 2 years and his 3 year deal will expire at the end of 5 years. I was critiquing if it’s the best development step to bring him to the bigs at this stage.


I don't see how this would harm his development, in fact it would probably benefit him more than not signing him. Now that he's under contract he can attend training camp, play in preseason games, and get a feel for the NHL game.
rebecca liked this.
Aug 22 at 2:55 PM
#15
Sensible Commentary
Joined: Jul 2016
Posts: 579
Likes: 145
Quoting: rebecca
Thanks! I sorta knew that but it’s the minutia that even a nerd like I can’t keep straight.

Then you move beyond Canada and you have some under 20’s who have their NHL ELC’s start ticking when they’re in the AHL and who some who don’t. And...well, I wish I’d never started down this road.
the road's not as long as it seems. any 18- or 19-year-old on an ELC who plays less than 10 NHL games delays the start of their ELC (assuming it hasn't already started; for example, the Penguins played Daniel Sprong in 18 games as an 18-year-old in 2015-16, so his ELC started, even though he palyed the entirety of his 19-year-old season in the QMJHL). Even NCAA players can make use of this slide: Clayton Keller's contract slid after he was signed away from BU because he was 19.
 
Reply
To create a post please Login or Register
Question:
Options:
Submit Poll Edit