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Alfie11

Member Since
Aug 6, 2020
Favourite Team
Ottawa Senators
2nd Favourite Team
Calgary Flames
Forum Posts
5328
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14.84
Forum Threads
92
Forum: Armchair-GM38 minutes ago
Tkachuk-Lindholm-Mangiapane
Pelletier-Zary-Coronato

That’s a very respectable top 6 in 3 or 4 years. Top line still in their prime, 2nd line just entering it. And it’s likely we keep Gaudreau around as well I’d say, and Dube is young, meaning we should have a good 3rd line (Coleman will still be around, probably need to find a 3C at some point). Could use a high end 1C obviously but those aren’t exactly a dime a dozen. Valimaki/Andersson/Hanifin should be a top tier, young, top 3 D as well, for years to come.

<div class="quote"><div class="quote_t">Quoting: <b>ItWasIn</b></div><div>That's a nice way of looking at things.

But I wouldn't be surprised if things turn ugly in Calgary if this season goes poorly. I could see Gaudreau asking for 8-9 mill on an extension. I'm also not convinced Tkachuk is a long-term Flame. To be honest, there's a very real reality where the Flames are forced into a rebuild in the next year or two.</div></div>
I think this year will be big for Tkachuk. Either Sutter falls in love with him or he’s a strong trade candidate next summer. I hope it’s the former, because he’s the heart and soul of the team and should be signed to a max term deal as our next captain imo. He finished the year with 6 goals in 5 games on the top line, which is a good sign for him personally and also what Sutter thinks of where he belongs in the lineup. I don’t think we can do a rebuild at this point tbh, we have too many young guys that are too good and we wouldn’t want to trade (starting with Lindholm/Tkachuk/Mangiapane in their mid-20s, but even Dube/Zary/Pelletier/Coronato would likely be too good to facilitate a proper rebuild unless we tank this year).
Forum: NHL5 hours ago
Forum: NHL6 hours ago
<div class="quote"><div class="quote_t">Quoting: <b>Alfie11</b></div><div>Buyout calculator works by you picking the year and then it calculates how much AAV against the cap and actual money is owed per season (in theory it’s 2/3 of the remaining total money paid out over twice the remaining term, but front- or back-loaded deals and signing bonuses mess with the cap hits resulting in stuff like the Minnesota situation).

They signed below their QO to get term and guaranteed money. Take ABB for example. His QO I believe was a hair under $800k, but it would have been a 1-year, 2-way deal with him making significantly less in the minors. The deal he signed is 2-way for the first year ($750k NHL, $200k AHL) and then 1-way the final two years ($750k in year 2 at both levels, $775k in year 3 at both levels). So the advantage for the player is he is guaranteed at least $1.725mil over the next three years, and there’s a decent incentive for the team to keep him in the NHL in years 2 and 3 if they’re paying him all that money anyway. The advantage for the team is they have cost certainty for what they see as a promising depth player for the next few seasons, and because they are willing to give out a bit of guaranteed money, they get to keep the cap hit extremely low in return (which is more important for a strong financially, but cap-strapped team like the Lightning). It’s very similar to the Joey Anderson situation signed last year if you didn’t understand this description and want to know more (I’m sure that was covered extensively because it was the Leafs and all). And yes it’s the player’s option to take this instead of the QO but like I said, it works better for both sides in situations like this.</div></div>
Minor correction, ABB has a guaranteed $250k in year 1 as well, so he’s actually guaranteed $1.775mil total. And Raddysh’s is very similar, but with $100k AHL salary in year 1 with $125k guaranteed ($1.65mil total guaranteed).
Forum: NHL6 hours ago
<div class="quote"><div class="quote_t">Quoting: <b>BulinWall</b></div><div>Hey does the buyout calculator work? How did Tampa sign Raddysh to 758k when his QO is 850k? Boris' QO is also 850k but are they somehow moving around this or is it the players' option to take a lower offer?
'</div></div>
Buyout calculator works by you picking the year and then it calculates how much AAV against the cap and actual money is owed per season (in theory it’s 2/3 of the remaining total money paid out over twice the remaining term, but front- or back-loaded deals and signing bonuses mess with the cap hits resulting in stuff like the Minnesota situation).

They signed below their QO to get term and guaranteed money. Take ABB for example. His QO I believe was a hair under $800k, but it would have been a 1-year, 2-way deal with him making significantly less in the minors. The deal he signed is 2-way for the first year ($750k NHL, $200k AHL) and then 1-way the final two years ($750k in year 2 at both levels, $775k in year 3 at both levels). So the advantage for the player is he is guaranteed at least $1.725mil over the next three years, and there’s a decent incentive for the team to keep him in the NHL in years 2 and 3 if they’re paying him all that money anyway. The advantage for the team is they have cost certainty for what they see as a promising depth player for the next few seasons, and because they are willing to give out a bit of guaranteed money, they get to keep the cap hit extremely low in return (which is more important for a strong financially, but cap-strapped team like the Lightning). It’s very similar to the Joey Anderson situation signed last year if you didn’t understand this description and want to know more (I’m sure that was covered extensively because it was the Leafs and all). And yes it’s the player’s option to take this instead of the QO but like I said, it works better for both sides in situations like this.
Forum: NHL9 hours ago